Lecture 9: Postmodern Culture, Social Political and Technological Aspects of It

Thursday, June 12, 2008, 7:30 p.m.

By: Aram Hessami, PhD.

Professor of Politics and Philosophy, Department of History & Political Science & Department of Philosophy, Montgomery Community College

Synopsis:

Postmodern Philosophy has indeed defined our present culture here in the West. He will explore some of the socio-political as well as some of the technical and economic aspects of this post-modern thinking and its overwhelming influence in our current culture.

About the Lecturer:

Dr. Hessami is currently professor of Politics and Philosophy at Montgomery Community College, the same college that he graduated from in 1981. He defended his PhD dissertation at the George Washington University in 1994. While the title of dissertation is “Postmodern Thinking and Democracy”, his studies are mainly focused on Western Political Thought, American Government, Political Ideologies, International Relations, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Ethics and Moral Philosophy. He has cooperated with different organizations as a consultant or political analyst.

Location:

Montgomery Community College (Rockville Campus)- Humanity Building (HU), Conference Room 009

Get Directions, Bulding Location on Campus

Dues: $15 per person, $5 for students (including dinner)

IAA-DC Scholarship Award Application Due Date

The application due date for IAA-DC scholarship award is extended to Saturday June 7, 2008. The 2007-2008 scholarships will be awarded in the next IAA-DC lecture on Thursday June 12, 2008.

All Iranian and Iranian-American students in Washington-Baltimore metropolitan area are eligible to apply for this award. You can find the application form and more details here.

IAA Monthly Lecture:

Cyrus Cylinder

First Declaration of Human Rights
or
Merely Propaganda?

Thursday, December 13, 2007, 7:00 p.m.

By: Hossein Badamchi, LLB., LLM.

PhD Candidate, Ancient Law at Johns Hopkins University

Synopsis:

Cyrus cylinder is a document from the time of Cyrus, the great Persian king in sixth century BC. Some scholars have described the first declaration of Human Rights; some others call it pure propaganda. He will read the document and discuss its contents in his lecture. The Cyrus cylinder is a fragmentary clay cylinder with an Akkadian inscription of thirty-five lines discovered in a foundation deposit by A. H. Rassam during his excavations at the site of Marduk temple in Babylon in 1879. P. R. Berger identified a second fragment containing lines 36-45, in the Babylonian collection at Yale University. The total inscription, though incomplete at the end, consist of forty-five lines, the first three almost entirely broken away.

The text contains an account of Cyrus’ conquest of Babylon in 539 B.C., beginning with a narrative by the Babylonian god Marduk of the crimes of Nabonidus, the last Chaldean king( lines 4-8). Then follows an account of Marduk’s search for a righteous king; his appointment of Cyrus to rule the entire world, and his causing Babylon to fall without a battle (9-19). Cyrus continues in the first person, giving his titles and genealogy (lines 20-22) and declaring that he has guaranteed the peace of the country (lines 22-26). For this achievement, he and his son Cambyses received the blessing of Marduk (lines 26-30).

He describes his restoration of the cult, which had been neglected during the reign of Nabunidus, and his permission to the exiled people to return to their homeland (lines 30-36). Finally, the king records his restoration of the defenses of Babylon( lines 36- 43) and reports that in the course of the work he saw an inscription of Ashurbanipal ( lines 43-45; cf. Kuhrt 1983, pp. 85-86).

About the Lecturer:

Mr. Badamchi is currently a PhD candidate at Johns Hopkins University.  He is studying “Ancient Law” with Professor Raymond Westbrook. He has also graduated from Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, in law. He has published two books on “Ancient Law” in Iran:

 “The Origins of Legislation”, Tarhe No. 2003 

“A History of Ancient Near Eastern Criminal Law”, SAMT 2004

Location:

Montgomery Community College (Rockville Campus)- Student Services Building (SV), Faculty and Staff Lounge

Get Directions, Bulding Location on Campus

Dues: $15 per person, $5 for students (including dinner)