Lecture 102: Medical Application of X-ray and Particle Beams

When: Thursday Dec 14, 2017 – 7:30 PM
Where: Montgomery Community College (Rockville Campus) – Humanities Building (HU), Conference Room 009
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Speaker: Mehrdad Sarfaraz, Ph.D.
Language: English

Synopsis:

X-ray has been used in imaging and treatment of cancers since its discovery by Rontgen in 1895. X-rays is part of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum with energies higher than visible light. X-rays are partially absorbed and scattered by tissues when striking the body but those that pass through the body can be detected to form an image of the internal organs. Images taken with one x-ray projection are called planar images. They are mainly good for imaging bony anatomies. Computed tomography (CT) is an imaging procedure that uses multiple X-ray projections to create detailed images of areas inside the body.
Shortly after the use of x-ray for imaging its damaging effect to personnel dealing with x-ray started to emerge. At the same time it was discovered that the same damaging effect can be used for treating cancers. Linear accelerators (Linac) provide high energy x-rays for cancer treatment. Currently there are all kinds of specialized Linacs for treating cancers. However the newest development in cancer treatment is using proton and other particle beams for therapy. In this talk history of x-ray in medical application and the recent application of particle beams in cancer therapy will be presented.

About the Speaker:

Mehrdad Sarfaraz is currently Chief Medical Physicist at George Washington University Hospital Radiation Oncology Center. He is certified by American Board of Radiology and has worked in the field of radiation oncology and radiology for over thirty years. His former position was Chief Technology and Innovation Officer at RadAmerica, a subsidiary of MedStar Health organization. He previously held multiple academic appointments including Associate Professor at University of Maryland Medical School.
Mehrdad Sarfaraz received his BS and MS in physics from Sharif University of Technology and Michigan State University correspondingly. He later on switched his field of study to Medical Physics and was granted PhD in Radiological Sciences from George Washington University. He has published many articles on radiation medical applications and has been invited to present in multiple conferences and seminars. He was recipient of a scholarship and a research grant and was awarded Teacher of the Year by Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology.

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Lecture 101: State Capability and Economic Growth

When: Thursday August 10, 2017 – 7:30 PM
Where: Montgomery Community College (Rockville Campus) – Humanities Building (HU), Conference Room 009
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Speaker: Masoomeh Khandan
Language: Farsi (Persian)

Synopsis:

In response to many international initiatives, developing countries adopt reforms without sustained improvements in performance. Developing countries adopt these reforms to increase their external legitimacy and support without improving their performance. These attempts can sum up with capability traps in which states cannot improve or even decline their capabilities (Andrews and et al.2013 ). However, after the 1979 revolution, Iran’s institutions and organizations have leveraged their resources and technical expertise to critical mass of people’s’ ability and willingness to initiate and maintain changes. In this lecture, I discuss about Iran, which has been able to escape isomorphic mimicry (which organizations change what they look like instead of what they do.) and improve its capability in the absence of international interventions. To understand how Iran solves its public problems, I structurally analyze a post-revolution successful Iranian reform. Then, I compare those successes with the world’s “best practices” (which often failed due to lack of domestic ownership and adaption of imported reforms) and extract some lessons learned; allowing us to answer the question how Iran can be a game changer in other sectors such as economic growth. Being a game changer in this period of time is very important for Iran’s long time economic growth.

About the Speaker:

Masoomeh Khandan is a Research Fellow at Harvard Center for International Development and a consultant at the Center for Global Development, a think tank in D.C. She won the World Bank fellowship to study the Master of Public Administration in International Development (MPA/ID) at Harvard Kennedy School of Government (HKS) in 2013. She also won 2015 Susan C. Eaton Memorial Prize for the best paper at HKS. Currently, She is working on economic development and economic growth.
Her undergrad studies were in Electrical Engineering at Sharif University of Technology. To address some issues of Iran’s education system, she participated in leading a community of highly motivated volunteers to form the “Asseman Group”, an NGO with the mission “to conceptualize and institute Iranian children with some of the decisive, but unfortunately less-emphasized, skills such as systems thinking, team work and life skills, through edutainment”. Encouraged by this project, she attended “Leading Education Systems at the National Level”, a program offered by Harvard Graduate School of Education. Also, she led a team of students and graduates from Harvard Kennedy School and Sharif University of Technology to evaluate Iranian’s higher education system. The results were delivered to Iran’s Ministry of Higher Education to incorporate in a policy for universities.

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Lecture 100: Complementary and Integrative Health

When: Thursday June 8, 2017 – 7:30 PM
Where: Montgomery Community College (Rockville Campus) – Humanities Building (HU), Conference Room 009
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Speaker: Mehrdad Michael Massumi, MD
Language: English

Synopsis:

The 2012 National Health Interview Survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) gathered information on 88,962 American adults and 17,321 children. The survey found that 33.2 percent of adults in the United States aged 18 years and over and 11.6 percent of children age 4 to 17 years used some form of Complementary and Integrative Health (CIH) approach in the previous 12 months.
Americans spent $30.2 billion out-of-pocket on CIH during the 12 months prior to the survey. Americans spent $14.7 billion out-of-pocket on visits to complementary practitioners – almost 30 percent of what they spent out-of-pocket on services by conventional physicians ($49.6 billion). They spent $12.8 billion out-of-pocket on natural product supplements – about one-quarter of what they spent out-of-pocket on prescription drugs ($54.1 billion).
Complementary and Integrative Medicine is a rapidly growing component of the healthcare services not only in the USA but worldwide. This talk will review the many facets of this area of healthcare and provide a systematic discussion and comparative analysis of complementary and integrative health disciplines, modalities and research as well as resources for further study of this important sector of health services.

About the Speaker:

Mehrdad Michael Massumi, MD is a board-certified specialist in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and a Diplomate of the American Academy of Pain Management.
After graduation with honors from the University of Birmingham Medical School (UK) and two years of surgical residency training at the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C. he undertook and concluded successfully his residency in Rehabilitation Medicine in Seattle, WA in 1988. He remains active at Harvard Postgraduate Medical Association.
Dr. Massumi has been in practice for twenty-eight years in Maryland. He was the founder or director of many Rehabilitation, Spine and Pain clinics in the Baltimore Metropolitan hospitals. He is a former clinical faculty of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medical School. He is currently in private practice in Baltimore and more recently also in Rockville, MD.

For this lecture: light refreshment will be provided

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